Humanities & Social Sciences

mercy college bruce hancy

Mr Bruce Hancy - Head of Learning Area

Year Seven

Students develop increasing independence in critical thinking and skill application, which includes questioning, researching, analysing, evaluating, communicating and reflecting. They apply these skills to investigate events, developments, issues, and phenomena, both historical and contemporary.

Term 1 - HISTORY

The Ancient World course investigates historical events, movements and developments from prehistory (from about 60 000 BCE) through to ancient societies in the Mediterranean and Asia (up to about 650 CE).Historical Skills focus on five key processes of historical inquiry - chronology, terms and concepts; historical questions and research; analysis and use of sources; perspectives and interpretations; and explanation and communication.

Term 2 – GEOGRAPHY

The concepts of place, space, environment, interconnection, sustainability and change continue to be developed as a way of thinking and provide students with the opportunity to inquire into the nature of water as a natural resource. The concept of place is expanded through students' investigation of the liveability of their own place. They apply this understanding to a wide range of places and environments at the full range of scales, from local to global, and in a range of locations

Term 3 – CIVICS and CITIZENSHIP

Students continue to build on their understanding of the concepts of the Westminster system and democracy by examining the key features of Australia's democracy, and how it is shaped through the Australian Constitution and constitutional change. The concepts of justice, rights and responsibilities are further developed through a focus on Australia's legal system.

Term 4 – ECONOMICS and BUSINESS

An understanding of the concepts making choices and allocation is further developed through a focus on the interdependence of consumers and producers in the market, the characteristics of successful businesses, including how entrepreneurial behaviour contributes to business success. Work and work futures are introduced, as students consider why people work. Students focus on national issues, with opportunities for the concepts to also be considered in relation to local community or global issues where appropriate.

 

Year Eight

Students develop increasing independence in critical thinking and skill application, which includes questioning, researching, analysing, evaluating, communicating and reflecting. They apply these skills to investigate events, developments, issues, and phenomena, both historical and contemporary.

Term 1 - GEOGRAPHY

The concepts of place, space, environment, interconnection, sustainability and change continue to be developed as a way of thinking and provide students with the opportunity to inquire into the significance of landscapes to people and the spatial change in the distribution of populations. They apply this understanding to a wide range of places and environments at the full range of scales, from local to global, and in a range of locations.

Term 2 – HISTORY

Students develop their historical understanding through key concepts, including evidence, continuity and change, cause and effect, perspectives, empathy, significance and contestability. These concepts are investigated within the historical context of the end of the ancient period to the beginning of the modern period, c. 650 AD (CE) – 1750. They consider how societies changed, what key beliefs and values emerged, and the causes and effects of contact between societies in this period.

Term 3 – CIVICS and CITIZENSHIP

Students continue to build on their understanding of the concepts of the Westminster system, democracy and participation. They investigate the types of law in Australia and how they are made. They consider the responsibilities and freedoms of citizens, and how Australians can actively participate in their democracy. Students explore the different perspectives of Australian identity.

Term 4 – ECONOMICS and BUSINESS

The concept of markets is introduced to further develop students understanding of the concepts of interdependence, making choices and allocation. They consider how markets work and the rights, responsibilities and opportunities that arise for businesses, consumers and governments. Work and work futures are explored as students consider the influences on the way people work now and consider how people will work in the future. Students focus on national and regional issues, with opportunities for the concepts to also be considered in relation to local community, or global, issues where appropriate.

 

Year Nine

Students develop increasing independence in critical thinking and skill application, which includes questioning, researching, analysing, evaluating, communicating and reflecting. They apply these skills to investigate events, developments, issues, and phenomena, both historical and contemporary.

Term 1 - HISTORY

Students develop their historical understanding through key concepts, including evidence, continuity and change, cause and effect, perspectives, empathy, significance and contestability. These concepts are investigated within the historical context of the making of the modern world from 1750 to 1918. They consider how new ideas and technological developments contributed to change in this period, and the significance of World War I.

Term 2 – GEOGRAPHY

The concepts of place, space, environment, interconnection, sustainability and change continue to be developed as a way of thinking, which provides students with an opportunity to inquire into the production of food and fibre, the role of the biotic environment and to explore how people, through their choices and actions, are connected to places in a variety of ways. Students apply this understanding to a wide range of places and environments at the full range of scales, from local to global, and in a range of locations.

Term 3 – CIVICS and CITIZENSHIP

Students continue to build on their understanding of the concepts of the Westminster system, democracy, democratic values, justice and participation. They examine the role of key players in the political system, the way citizens' decisions are shaped during an election campaign and how a government is formed. Students investigate how Australia's court system works in support of a democratic and just society.

Term 4 – ECONOMICS and BUSINESS

Students are introduced to the concepts of specialisation and trade while continuing to further their understanding of the key concepts of scarcity, making choices, interdependence, and allocation and markets. They examine the connections between consumers, businesses and government, both within Australia and with other countries, through the flow of goods, services and resources in a global economy. The roles and responsibilities of the participants in the changing Australian and global workplace are explored.

 

Year Ten

Students develop increasing independence in critical thinking and skill application, which includes questioning, researching, analysing, evaluating, communicating and reflecting. They apply these skills to investigate events, developments, issues, and phenomena, both historical and contemporary.

Term 1 - GEOGRAPHY

The concepts of place, space, environment, interconnection, sustainability and change continue to be developed as a way of thinking, through an applied focus on the management of environmental resources and the geography of human wellbeing at the full range of scales, from local to global and in a range of locations.

Term 2 – HISTORY

Students develop their historical understanding through key concepts, including evidence, continuity and change, cause and effect, perspectives, empathy, significance and contestability. These concepts are investigated within the historical context of the modern world and Australia from 1918 to the present, with an emphasis on Australia in its global context.

Term 3 – ECONOMICS and BUSINESS

Students are introduced to the concept of economic performance and living standards while continuing to further their understanding of the concepts of making choices, interdependence, specialisation, and allocation and markets through examining contemporary issues, events and/or case studies delving into the reasons for variations in the performance of economies. They explore the nature of externalities and investigate the role of governments in managing economic performance to improve living standards. They inquire into the ways businesses can manage their workforces to improve productivity.

Term 4 – CIVICS and CITIZENSHIP

Students continue to build on their understanding of the concepts of democracy, democratic values, justice, and rights and responsibilities by exploring Australia's roles and responsibilities at a global level and its international legal obligations. They inquire in to the values and practices that enable a resilient democracy to be sustained.

 

Years Eleven and Twelve

 ATAR courses are currently offered in:

  • Applied Information Technology (Year 12 only in 2016)
  • Accounting and Finance (General course also available)
  • Business Management and Enterprise (General course also available)
  • Economics
  • Geography
  • Modern History